Nee Enge En Anbe (TAMIL)

nee-enge-en-anbe-movie-poster-1

Starring: Nayanthara, Vaibhav, Pasupathy and many more
Editing : Marthand Venkatesh
Music : Keeravani
Cinematography : Vijay C Kumar
Directed by: Sekhar Kammula

Remake of Kahaani..!! Thats the only phrase known about this film once it was announced. Later came that lead wont be appearing as a pregnant lady. Half the eagerness gone as that was the sole of that beautifully penned Hindi film. But what does this remake of the Hindi film offers us in the screens. Not much though even though it was helmed by one of the different directors of the Telugu industry, anyhow will check that too.

For those who have not seen the original here is the plot. Anamika (Nayanthara), a young NRI woman, comes to India in search of her husband Ajay Swaminathan. She is helped by Parthasarathy (Vaibhav), the only Tamilian in the police station, who develops a crush of sorts over her. Even as a hit man is taking down all the people whom she goes to asking for help, Anamika is told by Khan (Pasupathy), an encounter specialist, that her husband is in fact Milan Damji, a terrorist mastermind. What happens after that is rest of the plot.

There are some additions, though, like a special task force humiliating Anamika in her hotel room, like Sarathy taking her to meet his mother and so on. However, Anamika is not pregnant like Balan’s Vidya Bagchi, and Kammula gives a climatic twist which is completely different from the original. Subtitles were only used for the Hindi dialogues. How can you expect Tamil audiences to understand Telugu dialogues even though the film is shot in Hyderabad? This was one of the biggest turn-offs in the film.

Nayantara as Anamika does her best as the lead role, but she’s no match to Vidya Balan. Here’s a woman who is struggling to find her husband in a new place with a language barrier, yet we see her with make-up and eyelashes in close up shots. She fails to get into the skin of her character which was very important for the story. Vaibhav and Pasupathy play their parts well but the fake English accent used by the latter could’ve been avoided. Keeravani’s resonating background score keeps the tension of the story alive throughout. Old Hyderabad becomes a crucial character in the story. Vijay C Kumar does his best to capture the flavour of the local culture when his lens zooms through the small alleys of the city, from the preparations of a Durga Puja to the busy and densely populated market. The slow first half is strongly complemented by a solid second half.

Sekhar Kammula is not interested in a frame-by-frame remake of the original and wants to stamp his fingerprints over this film is established the moment he introduces his heroine. Even though there were many additions and changes as like the beginning and ending of the film one just cant accept that more Telugu dialogues occupies the film. Overall, if you have seen Kahaani, you will find this as just an underwhelming and not so tightest of the remakes made. Take a choice..!! 🙂

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